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Benefits of Cupping Practitioners

As a practitioner of multiple modalities of East Asian Medicine, including bodywork and acupuncture, many people ask me about cupping. Why would I want to have cupping? What is it beneficial for?

Often when I describe the many benefits of cupping therapy, people cannot even believe that it could help so many different ailments. It seems too good to be true!!

Well, its not… It’s really THAT good. But cupping therapy is not for everyone, and here’s why.
The main function of cupping therapy is that it creates negative pressure on the superficial tissues of the body. This means, that the suction effect of cupping draws blood and body fluids from inside of the body toward the surface. Depending on the depth of the cup, it can draw from as deep as 6 cm into the body. This is not a depth of suction that is often indicated, or safe, but this demonstrates the power of cupping therapy.

Benefits of cupping

 

So, how does drawing blood and body fluids benefit the body, you ask? Our blood supplies nutrients, oxygen, nutrients, and takes away waste products. It also delivers immune cells to fight infections, and platelets to stop bleeding. So, any time there is injury, infection, or inflammation in an area of the body, having a fresh rich blood supply is going to be beneficial. In reality, having a rich, fresh blood supply to most parts of the body, most of the time is beneficial.

Just ask Michael Phelps!! There is no better testimonial than having the most celebrated Olympic athlete in history seek cupping therapy to enhance his performance in the pool. It’s hard to imagine he would have risked his career comeback for a treatment that he wasn’t certain would help him!!

 

HOW WILL CUPPING HELP MY PRACTICE?

Cupping is currently the most IN DEMAND health modality. Even before the 2016 Olympics there was a huge surge in the popularity of cupping therapy, which is attributed largely to the availability and ease of use of modern cupping vessels. Cupping is a super easy modality to practice, but to practice it with expert skill, and to fully understand the indications, cautions, and contraindications of cupping therapy (any powerful modality will have risks involved) it is highly advisable to take a well researched and respected training. Like any modality, there are many levels of skill that can be achieved, and many approaches to practice.

Cupping for Manual Therapists was developed by Lisa Dowling, who is a practitioner of both Eastern and Western modalities. She has incorporated her knowledge of Eastern Medicine to explain when and why to use each of the many cupping methods on what kind of condition, and which clients need certain techniques. Her understanding of anatomy, physiology, and dynamic movement is adapted to this course to enable you to move the body with the cups, as well as move the cups on the body.

Cupping for Manual Therapists is a dense, material packed 2 day training that could be stretched into 4 days of teaching. We understand that practitioners need to get back into the treatment room, so instead of keeping you in the classroom for four days, we have created a private Facebook page where graduates of the 2 day training gather and share ideas, ask questions, and review the training. Videos of all of the techniques are available on this page for graduates to access once they have completed the training.
The intention of this training system is to support practitioners, develop knowledge and skills, and provide insight into the mysterious chasm that lays between Eastern and Western Medicine. They are not so different, but the thought process definitely shifts the approach to the materials.

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